…and that’s a wrap (or a shawl?)

After about a week’s worth of night-time movie-knitting, the Age of Brass & Steam kerchief shawl is done and ready to be wrapped up and given to its new wearer. Age of Brass & Steam must have been just the right starter shawl for me: now that it’s done, I want to make another shawl, pronto. I’m hooked. This, from a knitter who has not only never knit a shawl, but has never worn one, either (and, to be honest, was a little confused about the difference, say, betweenΒ shawls, haps, and wraps. If there is a knitter out there who would like to shed a little light, I’m curious).

This is a great beginner pattern: it calls for 3 repeats of a stockinette + garter eyelet section to make a simple kerchief. I decided I wanted a roomier, hug-sized garment, and added an additional 4th repeat. The shawl ends in 3 rows of garter stitch. All in all, making it required ~ 310 yards of worsted weight on a size 7 24″ circular (cast-off using US 9s).

shawl wip1
July 26th: Half way through what ended up being a 45-minute bind off. I have never knit anything on this scale of stitches.

After steam blocking, the shawl measured 58″ across. I love its shape, and am still marveling at how the increases, worked ‘straight’ across on the circulars, popped out this neat isosceles triangle thing. Learning how to do this was not quite as big of a shocker as, say, my first sock heel-turn (unforgettable!) but I have to say, it’s up there in the instant replay ofΒ Knitting A-ha! Moments of 2017. The craft never ceases to amaze.

Age of Brass and Steam Shawlshawl FO1

Learnings

I’ll keep my learnings brief; from start to finish, this project was one big lesson. One thing, though: making this shawl has got me thinking about the importance of drape (something I have been neglecting). I’m happy with how this first one turned out, but am wondering what would have happened, drape-wise, if I’d gone up a few needle sizes. I suppose I’ll have to find out later, but am learning to keep things loose and let things flow. In any case, that’s how the shawl falls, I say (I suggest this as the shawl-knitter’s version of “that’s how the cookie crumbles”).

I’m curious: what, in your view, makes for a great shawl, wrap, or hap? Do you have a favourite one that you’ve done several times? What do you love about it? Do tell.

Wishing you a wonderful weekend, wherever you happen to be!

Advertisements

33 thoughts on “…and that’s a wrap (or a shawl?)

  1. that is really beautiful! I’d be afraid to give it away! ha! I’m not sure on the official difference between a shawl and a wrap, except that I would say a “wrap” is rectangular, not triangle or asymmetrical or anything like that? that being said. I made what I called a “rectangular shawl”…. maybe that was a wrap? hmm confusing!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for reading, Jo, and for your thoughts on this! That helps to parse out the different kinds of closely-related garments. πŸ™‚ I’m looking forward to seeing more of your shawl, and have been enjoying following your lovely WIPs!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m not entirely sure either but I think Jo Creates is right. A shawl is triangular and a wrap is rectangular.
    Whatever it’s called, yours is stunning!
    And as a former non-blocker, thank you for showing me what a huge difference a little steam can do!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Robin, for reading. I’ve long been a non-blocker, too; I understand! I just started blocking a few months ago, and have noticed the difference it makes. Steam + a little light smoothing over (w/hands) works nicely for getting the lumps out of acrylic. Happy crafting, and looking forward to seeing more of your poncho (so cool!).

      Like

  3. We can call it a Sharp, a shawl-wrap. Whatever it is, it’s certainly beautiful and the person who is receiving this is one lucky and worthy individual!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I like ‘shawl-wrap,’ and you’ve just given me an idea: I think I’ll present the garment to its new owner with that term! It does have elements of both, as I’m coming to understand them. Thank you for reading, Tony. Happy crafting!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I love working out intricate patterns in shawls–short and sweet and so much to explore πŸ™‚ plus, sizing and gauge are a little bit more fluid. Oh, and then there are the color experiments. Sigh, it’s funny, but I never thought I would fall for shawls . . . and then I did. Your recent FO is gorgeous, Shirley! Well done and I love the color!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Melissa, for sharing your thoughts. Yes – I love that gauge and sizing are very flexible, and that the same shawl could be worn by lots of different people. I feel like I’ve stumbled on the perfect gift-knit. I never thought I would fall for shawls, either, but am totally drawn in! I am still remembering your gorgeous Waiting for Rain shawl with the lace work (was that the pattern’s name?). Such a beautiful garment!

      Like

  5. It is looking great as a bigger shawl. Mine is kerchief size and nearly too small to tie around the neck. You already have the answer for shawls vs. wraps. For haps, I recommend you type the word in the search field of Kate Davies’ blog: she wrote an entire book on haps.
    My favorite so far has been McMilne, from Jane Richmond. A very simple triangle and assymetrical shawl. I knitted it twice and went larger the second time. You can find two posts on it on my blog if you search McMilne. I loved the simple lace pattern that create a crochet like texture. I totally understand why you want to knit a second shawl now. If you want more drape, I recommend a silk blend. And silk and cashmere will give you the ultimate luxury experience. Happy knitting !

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Agnes. I will check out Davies’ blog . Thank you for suggesting it! I remember hearing mention of her book, but didn’t know she had a blog. πŸ™‚ And oh, my goodness – your McMilne is absolutely gorgeous. I love that deep, rich green lacework you’ve done and you’ve photographed it beautifully. I can see why you’d do this one twice – it’s heavenly (will read the post in more detail). And yes, I am dreaming of working something in silk! Happy knitting, Agnes!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. You did a beautiful job! I hadn’t ever worn a shawl/hap/wrap before making one either, but I love them now – you can squish them up and wear them like a scarf or unfurl them to keep your shoulders warm or even use them like a lap blanket in a chilly movie theater. I like shawls that have a loose gauge or that are lacy; they drape really well, but they’re also easier and more pleasant to fold up and use as a scarf. So far I haven’t made two shawls twice, but I did discover that I like to use crescent shaped shawls, I made Cladonia and it’s my favorite.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Thank you, Mandy. πŸ™‚ Exactly – I hadn’t realized how versatile and comforting they were until now. Now, I feel as though life has been divided into 2 eras: pre- and post-shawl (I also like the idea of having something to bring with to chilly indoor spaces). I’ll remember the point about the looser gauge for drape + foldabiity next time. πŸ™‚ Cladonia is such a beauty! I’m admiring all that incredible colour and lacework! Wow! The Aranami you’ve been working is also so gorgeous. Thanks for the shawl-inspiration!

    Like

  8. Oh wow, Shirley – this turned out beautifully! I would absolutely have been tempted to keep it for myself πŸ˜‰ I think you did the right thing in adding an extra repeat of the pattern, it’s made it a great snuggly size… Even if that bind-off took forever! I’m sure the lucky recipient will love it πŸ˜€ Oh, and if you’re looking for more shawl/wrap inspiration, check out Jem Arrowsmith Knits… I started following her blog a few years back (although she’s more active on Instagram these days) and recently she’s started to publish her own patterns. Some of them are really stunning! Happy browsing! πŸ˜€

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Helen. I’m developing an appreciation for shawls – it’s like sporting a legitimately wearable blanket. 😎 Thank you for the link; Jem’s knitting is gorgeous! Truly heavenly shawl knitting! I can’t wait to take a closer look at her different patterns. Happy Tuesday, Helen, and thank you. πŸ™‚

      Like

  9. I’ve just found your blog via Knitting The Stash vlog on Youtube. So glad I did! Age of Brass and Steam is a fun knit and yours is just lovely. I’ve made a few of this one and Stephen West’s Boneyard shawl. I love how I can make them as large or small as the mood strikes and they’re both great in different weights of yarn.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m glad you did, too. πŸ™‚ Yes, that’s part of what makes these such great patterns – they’re versatile and produce a beautiful garment pretty much no matter what (the Boneyard shawl is beautiful, thank you for mentioning it). As a new knitter, I was also happy to be a little lazy with gauge, for once (though not entirely!) Thank you for stopping by, Sue!

      Like

  10. It’s beautful, and such a lovely colour! I’ve only made one so far and it was a virus shawl. I didn’t think I was a shawl person AT ALL, but when it came time to list it in my etsy shop I just couldn’t do it. I’ve worn it several times since and I love it! I suppose the Lost In Time pattern I’m making right now is technically a shawl pattern, but I’m only using one little skein and making it more of a scarf so I don’t know if that counts!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Isn’t funny that they have an unexpected appeal? (I’m sorry to have dismissed them all this time!) They are quite the ultimate in coziness. Happy shawl knitting to you, and looking forward to following your Lost in Time. πŸ™‚

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s